The Restaurant Group Blog

TRG SUPPORT AFTER HURRICANES HARVEY AND IRMA

Hurricane Irma devastated Florida leaving over 6 million people out of their homes, and now its time to start the clean up process.

Hurricane Irma Harvey Restaurant Support

In the wake of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey, we’re supporting restaurant and hospitality businesses affected by the storms.

TRG is standing by you and with you, ready to help in any way we can. Have equipment that was damaged and needs to be replaced? We can help with that. Need to rebuild, we can help with that, too. Whatever you need, we’re here to roll up our sleeves and help you move forward.

TRG is now offering Hurricane Relief Assistance discounts on all services and equipment to those in affected areas. Proceeds from now till November 1st, 2017 will go to the American Red Cross, Save the Children, Humane Society and/or local food banks to support rescue and recovery efforts.

LOOKING TO LEND A HAND?

If you’re looking for a way to help with the relief efforts, there are several charities always looking for volunteers and donations. See how you can make a difference today.

A great way for you to help is by visiting Red Cross Relief Fund for Hurricane Irma and Harvey for a quick easy cash donation, simply select ‘Harvey’ or ‘Irma’ when you donate.

Click below for more ways to help.

Of course with the closure of blood banks, there may be a shortage of blood. You can also contact the Red Cross to make an appointment to donate blood.

Restaurant Renovation Pt 2: Creating Your Design Concept

restaurant design concept

In Part 1 of this two-part post, we talked about how to decide if your restaurant is ready for a face lift. If you’re still reading, congratulations! You’re ready to modernize your business. Don’t start picking out paint chips and fabric swatches just yet, however – the best renovation plans are only complete with a fully formed restaurant design concept from the very beginning.

Who is My Clientele?

So you’ve decided that your current design doesn’t work for the crowd you’re hoping to attract — but who, exactly, are you trying to attract? Families? Businessmen? College students? Tourists? Every design and menu decision that you make has to be centered around your target clientele, so make sure you clarify exactly who that is before you go any further.

What Do I Want to Accomplish?

Making more money and attracting more customers are rather vague as far as goals go. Instead, consider things like, do you want to completely re-do the vibe of your space, or do you only have the budget to freshen it up a bit? Do you need to strengthen your brand image, or re-create it entirely? Clearly define your goals now, and your plans will roll much more smoothly later on in the process.

What Do My Current Customers Like?

In undergoing a renovation, you run the risk of losing customers who don’t like what you’ve done with the place. It may be a good idea to run an opinion poll for a few weeks at least before you start getting into the nitty-gritty of your renovation. You may be able to incorporate things that your current clients like, and get some ideas of things that new customers may want to see as well.

Who Am I Working With?

Unless you are one of the rare restaurant owners who can also contract a renovation project, you will be working with others to get your restaurant in shape. The right design team can make all the difference to the end result. Our dedicated designers at TRG Restaurant Consulting will listen to your goals and desires to help you design a space that meets your needs, and that your customers will love.

Restaurant Renovation Pt 1: Are You Ready for a Face Lift?

Renovation

Established business owners sometimes feel that updating or renovating their restaurant space is an unnecessary expense. After all, if it’s not broken, why fix it? However, you could be losing business if it has been more than five or six years since you’ve changed up the customer experience at your restaurant. If you think you may be ready to give your space a face lift, ask yourself these four questions.

Does My Dining Area Speak to the Right Crowd?

While you may have no trouble getting repeat business from the Baby Boomers who have had their morning coffee at your place for the past twenty years, your restaurant could have a lot more potential than that. Do Gen Y and Millennials visit often? Or do you have a space that is family-oriented? If your dining area is no longer a good fit for the customers you are hoping to attract, it’s time to make some changes.

Are My Competitors Making Changes?

You can’t base all your business decisions on what the competition is doing, but if several restaurants in your area have updated their space, it’s probably time for you to do the same. After all, you don’t want your clients heading over to the burger joint down the street simply because it looks newer.

Is There Enough Space?

In just about every industry, minimalism is becoming more popular, requiring more spacious areas with fewer things in them. In other words, people expect to have more room. Elbow-to-elbow cafes and crowded diners are just not viable restaurant spaces anymore.

Do I Like Coming to Work?

You got into the restaurant business for a reason — because you love serving food to people who love to eat it, right? But if it feels like a drag to step into your restaurant, a renovation could give you the boost you need to love what you do again. They do say that a change is as good as a rest.

At TRG Restaurant Consulting, we are passionate about helping restaurant owners create an experience that they and their customers will love. Stay tuned for Part 2, where you can find out how to create the restaurant space of your dreams.

Efficient Designs and Why You Need Them

Restaurant Design

In the restaurant industry, things must carefully be planned out. A well designed kitchen, bar, and floor plan is key to your success as an establishment. When we talk about designs, one might think about the visual appearance. That’s all good and well but that is not the sole factor you need to focus on. Looking good isn’t enough.

Layout

Whether you are renovating an established eatery or opening a new business, you should remain conscious of how things are setup. How much space do you have? What do you need to fit in it? Where can it go? Is your layout up to code? Can your layout provide you with the flexibility needed? These are all questions that you need to ask your self.

Brand and Concept

What should customers think when they come to eat in your restaurant? How should they feel when they sit at your bar? Do the designs of your space convey that? Does it compliment the finer points of your restaurant? Your aesthetics should convey the type of restaurant that you are and your customers should feel comfortable in them.

Efficiency and Economy

Your restaurant should be equipped to serve its customers in the way that they expect. Do your employees have the space they need to work in a way that reflects well upon your restaurant? Is your equipment cost-effective? Are you reducing costs where you can? Is your restaurant energy-efficient?

TRG Restaurant Consulting

TRG has the project services and restaurant consultants needed to help provide you with the productive results that you want. Our services include but are not limited to:

  • Architectural and interior design plan integration
  • Food-service layout and design
  • Professional installations
  • Project management
  • Mechanical requirements
  • Custom mill-work
  • Custom bars
  • Standard kitchen ventilation and extraction
  • Carbon filter systems and odor control
  • Make-up air systems and replenishment

For more information visit us.

 

Restaurant Design: Building the Efficient Commercial Kitchen

Restaurant Design: Building the Efficient Commercial Kitchen

 

 Restaurant Design Kitchen

Your restaurant design is a reflection of your brand. From the front of house design to the back of house, your entire design plan needs to reflect your brand’s personality, market position and mission.

Efficient Restaurant Design

Whether you have a large chain or one store, it’s necessary to take every detail into account; from the store front sign to the table settings. The front of house design should reflect the style of your brand in its décor, also a large consideration should be paid to the construction of the service areas, to include the layout organization and efficiencies. If something looks beautiful but doesn’t function well, your customers will be the first to notice.

The front of house design is an important part of your image, but the back of house is the heart of your operation. Poor commercial kitchen design cannot only decrease your productivity, but it will impact your bottom line in many ways from food waste to loss of business.

Proper Planning

Before you can design your commercial kitchen, you need a solid plan. For example, consider your inventory needs, health codes, the type of food will you be serving and how you will be serving it. Retaining a restaurant consultant is the best way to plan. A consultant can help you establish your menu and make the best use of your kitchen space to increase restaurant efficiency.

There are several areas of a commercial kitchen that need to be established and there are a few popular configurations for different styles of service. Each layout factors in the workflow which includes receiving, storage, food preparation, meal cooking, cleaning and washing, waste disposal and most importantly service. Whichever design you chose, remember to keep it flexible in case your menu options change, use commercial grade appliances and building materials. It is also critical that you create specific work zones that will provide your employees with maximum efficiency to complete their duties.

Popular Configurations

Depending upon what category your restaurant falls into, there are three main layouts you can use to increase food production time and employee communication. These are simple guidelines that are flexible and easily modified to fit your specific needs.

Assembly-line

Many fast food or fast-casual restaurants use an assembly line set up in their kitchens. if you are making many of the same types of food or using the same ingredients in different ways, the assembly line configuration usually works best. This format arranges the kitchen in order of materials used. There is usually a preparation area connected to a cooking area that hands off to a service area. In this setup, the cleaning and storage areas are behind the line. This design offers speed and the ability to process orders quickly without employees running between stations.

 Food Service Design

The Island

The island configuration is designed with one main block in the middle of the kitchen area where food is prepped and cooked. Most often you will find the cooking spaces with appliances and equipment in this area. On the outer walls surrounding the kitchen, you will find cleaning storage, food prep and service areas with a circular flow. The Island offers a good flow for workers to move around and better communication among employees.

Food Service Design

The Zone

This layout is organized by blocks, placing major equipment around the walls. Like the other two models, this design flows in an ordered manner and allows for easy communication among employees preparing the food. It also provides more space in the center of the work area for employees to easily move to-and-from different stations.

Food Service Design

Always keep in mind that each of these designs can be modified easily depending on the equipment you use as well as the space and shape of your kitchen.

Other Considerations

Depending on where you are constructing your kitchen, you will find different local, state and county regulations. The planning and zoning restrictions vary from city to city, so you may not be aware of the required fire, electrical and plumbing codes. Additionally, you will need to apply for permits and licenses so it is important to know what you’re doing before you begin your design. Restaurant consultants are specialists in this field of design, so using one to help guide you through the entire commercial kitchen design and build process, will often save you time, money and headaches, not to mention, help you increase your restaurant’s efficiency and bottom line profits.

Contact TRG Restaurant Consulting for a free commercial kitchen design consultation.

Managing the Restaurant Design Lifecycle

Restaurants and all businesses in general have very similar lifecycles comprising five stages beginning with the startup phase, where restaurant design is crucial, and ending with either a rebirth or reinventing of the business model as it begins to decline and deteriorate; or dissolution as a going concern due to irrelevance with current market trends. More specifically, these lifecycle stages are startup, growth, maturity, decline, and rebirth/cessation.

Restaurant Design
Source: PC Scholars

Interested in Working With The Restaurant Group?

Send a message to set up a meeting with our team

Contact us now